Amethyst and Incense

find beauty in everything

25,040 notes

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

whoo boy am I sick of this, yuuuup

(via faitherinhicks)

See also: How to Train Your Dragon 2. Someone please explain to me why Astrid is not the Chief. Actually don’t. It will just make me angry.

(via faitherinhicks)

154,285 notes

megsmakesart:

odditiesoflife:

Ten of the Best Storybook Cottage Homes Around the World

These 10 fairy tale inspired cottages with their hand-made details call to mind the tales of the Brothers Grimm and other fantasy stories. All of these cottages are real-life homes from around the world. From stunning cottage houses to mystical stone dwellings, these 10 storybook cottage homes provide inspiration and inspire the imagination.

  1. Hobbit House - Rotorua, New Zealand
  2. Winckler Cottage - Vancouver Island, Canada
  3. Akebono kodomo-no-mori Park, Japan
  4. Wooden Cottage - Białka Tatrzańska, Tatra Mountains, Poland
  5. Blaise Hamlet - Bristol, England
  6. Willa Kominiarski Wierch - Zakopane, Poland
  7. Forest House - Efteling, The Netherlands
  8. Cottage in the Hamlet of Marie Antoinette - Versailles, France
  9. Cob House - Somerset, United Kingdom
  10. The Spadena House - Beverly Hills, California, United States

WANT

(Source: beautifullife.info, via shortcuttothestars)

1,482 notes

Anonymous asked: FUN STORY my old English lit tutor used Lolita as an example of an unreliable narrator. The whole novel is basically about the main character justifying his pursuit of Lolita by interpreting her innocent behaviour as sexual and adult. The fact that she comes across as so "mature" in the novel is because the main character is trying to convince himself that she is mature so he can justify his abusive behaviour. It's essentially a internal commentary of a paedophile grooming a child.

a-little-bi-furious:

rain907:

missmarvelprincess:

a-little-bi-furious:

What really pisses me off is that Nabokov regretted writing it in the end because he kept constantly having to explain that this is what the novel was about because readers just did not get this at all.

People who think it is a love story and view Humbert as in any way sympathetic as the poor man who “gave into his dark desires” worry me immensly.

people are terrible and bad at literature

I didn’t know this book could be misunderstood 

Tell me about it, we’ve got people reviewing it in barnes and noble as “the greatest forbidden love story”, these folks either have not read the book or need to be investigated.

611 notes

HARRY POTTER HISTORY MEME → three historical witches [2/3] » Wendelin the Weird 

Wendelin the Weird was a witch who lived in the Middle Ages. She allowed herself to be caught 47 times in various disguises by witch-hunters, who tried to burn her at the stake. With the use of a Flame-Freezing Charm, however, the flames were rendered harmless, creating only a gentle tickling sensation which Wendelin enjoyed.

(via acciomychildhood)